Biography

Dr. Nathan Waller is a licensed speech-language pathologist who works exclusively in the assessment and treatment of both non-organic and organic voice and airway disorders. In addition to the diversity of diagnoses Dr. Waller treats, he specializes in the rehabilitation of disordered singing voices and in post-operative rehabilitation. He began his career in music education and in performance in the area of vocal music and made the exciting transition to speech-language pathology in 2007. During his graduate training, he was mentored by voice faculty at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, and by leading voice pathologists at UNC-Chapel Hill and at the Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center during his medical practicums. Dr. Waller furthered his training in the area of voice by completing his clinical fellowship at the Bastian Voice Institute, learning from and working with leaders in the field of laryngology and voice therapy. In 2014, he began his position at Northwestern University, which is consistently ranked as one of the top speech pathology programs in the country.

At Northwestern University, Dr. Waller works as a clinical instructor and placement coordinator of medical externships for students enrolled in the Communication Sciences and Disorders program. He continues his clinical work in the area of voice and regularly presents across the country on topics pertaining to voice and clinical teaching. Beyond working in the area of voice disorders, he has a special interest in transgender and gender nonconforming voice/communication therapy. Along with colleagues at Northwestern and at the Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital, he helped design and build a group pediatric transgender/gender nonconforming voice program, one of the first in the country.

Outside of clinical work, Dr. Waller teaches two graduate level courses in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Northwestern University. These include Voice Pathology and Physiology and Advanced Studies in Voice Problems.